Monday, 23 June 2008

Purpose of life

I concur with a recent posting on the purpose of life. The purpose of life is to develop an appetite for death. Those who live best die best too, by which I mean they are rarely desperate to cling to life after a life lived full.

We change our past from moment to moment but are unaware of it because our memories are always entirely consistent with our latest 'choice'. When we finally realise we've been going round and around in circles, we stop and accept the current situation with dignity.

Our bodies are but a decoy - any creator knows its creations will eventually try to reverse engineer themselves, so give them something to while away the hours on - hearts, lungs, kidneys - all there so we don't go 'Aha! The simulation stops here!'. Same goes for 'outer' space. Sorry, but yes, the brain is a mucous secreting organ after all!

When my Sims can tell me whether I am running XP or Vista, then I will believe we can really understand the environment in which we find ourselves. Until then, don't worry about it too much. Houdini escaped not by struggling against his bonds but by relaxing.

Eternal returnist or born again reincarnationalist?! I will probably put that decision off to the very end, being the eleventh hour decisionist I am.

4 comments:

SM Kovalinsky said...

Thank you for this post. Were you referring to the post regarding death by Jason Horsley, or another? I do know well the Nietzschean idea of "dying at the right time". Of course life can not always be lived fully; I would agree that when it is, a pot poured out has fulfilled its spout, and need not cling to repetition merely. Although Nietzsche himself clung with fierceness to the idea of eternal recurrence as a sort of permanence, and defended it mightily. You have an interesting turn of mind.

roshni said...

Reminds of a poem that i studied, by emily dickinson...

BECAUSE I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

SM Kovalinsky said...

That is a nice reference of Emily Dickinson, Roshni.

Karl L Le Marcs said...

Carenza: I'm afraid that, as I simply CANNOT agree with your opening statement to your post, plus the fact that I have previously given my opinion on this subject extensively, I would rather not repeat myself here once more.